Why Having a Financial Professional Matters

Posted by on Dec 30, 2018 in 401k, 403b, bank statements, Boomers. Millenials, Budgeting, Consumer Tools, Credit & Debt, Deflation, estate planning, family finances, financial advice, financial planning, Fixed Income Investing, Inflation, insurance, Investing, IRA, Life Stages, Medicare Planning, Persoanl Financial tips, Retire Happy, Retire Happy Now, Retirement, retirement, retirement calculator, retirement planning, sales, Saving Money, social security, tax returns, taxes, TSA | 0 comments

A good professional provides important guidance and insight through the years.   Provided by Frederick Saide, Ph.D.   What kind of role can a financial professional play for an investor? The answer: a very important one. While the value of such a relationship is hard to quantify, the intangible benefits may be significant and long lasting. A good financial professional can help an investor interpret today’s financial climate, determine objectives, and assess progress toward those goals. Alone, an investor may be challenged to do any of this effectively. Moreover, an uncounseled investor may make self-defeating decisions.   Some investors never turn to a financial professional. They concede that there might be some value in maintaining such a relationship, but they ultimately decide to go it alone. That may be a mistake.     No investor is infallible. Investors can feel that way during a great market year, when every decision seems to work out well. In long bull markets, investors risk becoming overconfident. The big-picture narrative of Wall Street can be forgotten, along with the reality that the market has occasional bad years.   This is when irrational exuberance creeps in. A sudden market shock may lead an investor into other irrational behaviors. Perhaps stocks sink rapidly, and an investor realizes (too late) that a portfolio is overweighted in equities. Or, perhaps an investor panics during a correction, selling low only to buy high after the market rebounds.   Often, investors grow impatient and try to time the market. Poor market timing may explain this divergence: according to investment research firm DALBAR, the S&P 500 returned an average of 8.91% annually across the 20 years ending on December 31, 2015, while the average equity investor’s portfolio returned just 4.67% per year.1                  The other risk is that of financial nearsightedness. When an investor flies solo, chasing yield and “making money” too often become the top pursuits. The thinking is short term.   A good financial professional helps a committed investor and retirement saver stay on track. He or she helps the investor set a course for the long term, based on a defined investment policy and target asset allocations with an eye on major financial goals. The client’s best interest is paramount.   As the investor-professional relationship unfolds, the investor begins to notice the intangible ways the professional provides value. Insight and knowledge inform investment selection and portfolio construction. The professional explains the subtleties of investment classes and how potential risk often relates to potential reward. Perhaps most importantly, the professional helps the client get past the “noise” and “buzz” of the financial markets to see what is really important to his or her financial life.   This...

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S Some Changes Are Coming For 401(k) Plans

Posted by on Dec 23, 2018 in 401k, 403b, atuos, bank statements, Boomers. Millenials, cars, college planning, Consumer Tools, credit card statements, Deflation, Elder Care, estate planning, family finances, financial advice, financial planning, Fixed Income Investing, Inflation, insurance, Investing, IRA, IRS, Retire Happy Now, Retirement, retirement, retirement calculator, retirement planning, social security, tax returns, taxes, TSA | 0 comments

Take note of them for 2019. Provided by Frederick Saide, Ph.D. Some notable developments are about to impact 401(k) plans. They follow a major change that became effective in 2018. Thanks to the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act, workers who borrow from 401(k) accounts and leave their jobs now have until October of the following year to repay plan loans.1 The Internal Revenue Service has eased the rules on 401(k) hardship distributions. Plan participants who arranged such withdrawals in 2018 (and years prior) paid an opportunity cost. The Internal Revenue Code barred these employees from making periodic contributions to their 401(k) accounts for six months after the withdrawal, and it also prevented them from exercising any stock options for that length of time.2 In 2019, some flexibility enters the picture. The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 (passed in February) allows plan sponsors to remove both of those restrictions in 2019, if they wish.2 Some fine print worth noting: the BBA also permits plan sponsors to give employees more sources for hardship withdrawals. In 2019, plan participants may take hardship distributions from their 401(k) account earnings, qualified non-elective employer contributions (QNECs), and qualified matching contributions (QMACs) in addition to elective deferral contributions, discretionary employer profit-sharing contributions, regular matching contributions, and earnings on contributions made before December 31, 1988.2 In 2018 and years prior, a plan participant could only take a hardship distribution after taking a loan from his or her 401(k) account. Next year, plan sponsors can waive this requirement, if they choose, and let their employees take hardship withdrawals from 401(k)s without a loan first.2 In addition, plan sponsors may let victims of California wildfires make special hardship withdrawals. An individual who suffered economic losses due to the massive fires in the Golden State (and whose principal residence is in a California wildfire disaster area) may take qualified wildfire distributions of up to $100,000 from a 401(k) through December 31, 2018. The money withdrawn is fully taxable, but the withdrawal is not subject to a 10% early withdrawal penalty. The amount withdrawn can also be recontributed to the plan within three years of the distribution. This type of hardship withdrawal may be permitted immediately; the plan sponsor has until the last day of the first plan year, beginning on or after January 1, 2019, to revise the plan documents to denote the new terms.2 What do these rule changes mean for companies sponsoring 401(k) plans? The message is clear. Review your plan documents and hardship withdrawal guidelines before 2019 begins, and decide whether you want to include these provisions. Lastly, annual contribution limits for 401(k) accounts are rising. An employee can put up to $19,000 into a 401(k) in...

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VThe Value of Insuring Against Life’s Risks

Posted by on Dec 17, 2018 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Building wealth requires protection from the forces of wealth destruction.                                Provided by Frederick Saide, Ph.D. When you are planning for your future, what do you think about? You may think about your retirement, enjoying having the time and money to take trips and pursue your interests. Maybe you think about your home and enjoying the feeling of stability that can come with home ownership. In making these plans, people often find that their long-term view involves money, in some fashion. That said, life also involves risk as well as unforeseen events that can change our plans in an instant. As an example, sudden injury or disability could leave you in a financial bind, unable to work for an extended period of time, or ever again. For this reason, among others, insurance is an important tool in allowing you to build and maintain your wealth, as well as protecting it from unanticipated and destructive forces. Did you know: * Sixty-eight percent of American workers have no long-term disability income protection.1 * Roughly 70 million Americans aged 18-38 have no life insurance.2 * About one driver in eight is uninsured?3 If you ask a homeowner, replacing a roof is probably the least satisfying expense they will ever face. While the value of such an investment is obvious, it doesn’t quite provide the satisfaction of new landscaping. Yet, when a heavy rain comes, ask that same owner if they would have preferred the nice flowers or a sturdy roof. Insurance is a lot like that roof. It’s not a terribly gratifying expenditure, but it may offer protection against the myriad of potential financial storms that can touch down in your life. The uncertainties of life are wide ranging, and many of them can threaten the financial security of you and your family. We understand most of these risks;for example, a home destroyed by a fire and a car accident are just two common risks that could subject you to outsized financial loss. Similarly, your resulting inability to earn a living to support yourself and your family due to death or disability can wreak long-term financial havoc on those closest to you. Insurance exists to protect you from these forms of wealth destruction. Some insurance (e.g., home or car) may be required, but when it isn’t mandatory(e.g., life or disability), individuals are tempted to avoid the certain financial “loss” associated with insurance premiums, while simultaneously,assuming the risk of much larger losses, which are less likely to happen. But insurance premiums aren’t a financial “loss” – they are designed to help protect you and your family as you build...

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A Retirement Fact Sheet

Posted by on Dec 9, 2018 in 401k, 403b, bank statements, Boomers. Millenials, college planning, Consumer Tools, credit card statements, Deflation, Elder Care, estate planning, family finances, financial advice, financial planning, Fixed Income Investing, Inflation, insurance, Investing, IRA, IRS, Medicare Planning, Retire Happy Now, Retirement, retirement, retirement calculator, retirement planning, sales, social security, tax returns, taxes, TSA | 0 comments

Some  specifics about the “second act.” Provided by Frederick Saide, Ph.D. Does your vision of retirement align with the facts? Here are some noteworthy financial and lifestyle facts about life after 50 that might surprise you.  Up to 85% of a retiree’s Social Security income can be taxed. Some retirees are taken aback when they discover this. In addition to the Internal Revenue Service, 13 states levy taxes on some or all Social Security retirement benefits: Colorado, Connecticut, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana,Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, and West Virginia. (It is worth mentioning that the I.R.S. offers free tax advice to people 60 and older through its Tax Counseling for the Elderly program.)1 Retirees get a slightly larger standard deduction on their federal taxes. Actually, this is true for all taxpayers aged 65 and older, whether they are retired or not. Right now, the standard deduction for an individual taxpayer in this age bracket is $13,600, compared to $12,000 for those 64 or younger.2 Retirees can still use IRAs to save for retirement. There is no age limit for contributing to a Roth IRA, just an inflation-adjusted income limit. So, a retiree can keep directing money into a Roth IRA for life, provided they are not earning too much. In fact, a senior can potentially contribute to a traditional IRA until the year they turn 70½.1 A significant percentage of retirees are carrying education and mortgage debt. The Consumer Finance Protection Bureau says that throughout the U.S., the population of borrowers aged 60 and older who have outstanding student loans grew by at least 20% in every state between 2012 and 2017. In more than half of the 50 states, the increase was 45% or greater. Generations ago, seniors who lived in a home often owned it, free and clear; in this decade, that has not always been so. The Federal Reserve’s recent Survey of Consumer Finance found that more than a third of those aged 65-74 have outstanding home loans; nearly a quarter of Americans who are 75 and older are in the same situation.1 As retirement continues, seniors become less credit dependent. GoBankingRates says that only slightly more than a quarter of Americans over age 75 have any credit card debt, compared to 42% of those aged 65-74.1 About one in three seniors who live independently also live alone. In fact, the Institute on Aging notes that nearly half of women older than age 75 are on their own. Compared to male seniors, female seniors are nearly twice as likely to live without a spouse, partner, family member, or roommate.1 Around 64% of women say that they have no “Plan B” if forced to...

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Tax Scams & Schemes

Posted by on Dec 3, 2018 in 401k, 403b, atuos, bank statements, Boomers. Millenials, cars, college planning, Consumer Tools, credit card statements, Deflation, Elder Care, estate planning, family finances, financial advice, financial planning, Fixed Income Investing, Inflation, insurance, Investing, IRA, IRS, Medicaid Planning, Medicaid Recovery, Medicare Planning, Retire Happy Now, Retirement, retirement, retirement calculator, retirement planning, sales, social security, tax returns, taxes, TSA | 0 comments

The “dirty dozen” favored by criminals & cheats.   Provided by Frederick Saide, Ph.D.   Year after year, criminals try to scam certain taxpayers. Year after year, certain taxpayers resort to schemes in an effort to put one over on the Internal Revenue Service (I.R.S.). These cons occur year-round, not just during tax season. In response to their frequency, the I.R.S. has listed the 12 biggest offenses – scams that you should recognize, schemes that warrant penalties and/or punishment.   Phishing. If you get an unsolicited email claiming to be from the I.R.S., it is a scam. The I.R.S. never reaches out via email, regardless of the situation. If such an email lands in your inbox, forward it to phishing@irs.gov. You should also be careful with sending personal information, including payroll or other financial information, via an email or website.1,2   Phone scams. Each year, criminals call taxpayers and allege that said taxpayers owe money to the I.R.S. The Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration says that over the last five years, 12,000 victims have been identified, resulting in a cumulative loss of more than $63 million. Visual tricks can lend authenticity to the ruse: the caller ID may show a toll-free number. The caller may mention a phony I.R.S. employee badge number. New spins are constantly emerging, including threats of arrest, and even deportation.1,2   Identity theft. The I.R.S. warns that identity theft is a constant concern, but not just online. Thieves can steal your mail or rifle through your trash. While the I.R.S. has made headway in terms of identifying such scams when related to tax returns, and plays an active role in identifying lawbreakers, the best defense that remains is caution when your identity and information are concerned.1,2   Return preparer fraud. Almost 60% of American taxpayers use a professional tax preparer. Unfortunately, among the many honest professionals, there are also some con artists out there who aim to rip off personal information and grab phantom refunds, so be careful when making a selection.1,2   Fake charities. Some taxpayers claim that they are gathering funds for hurricane victims, an overseas relief effort, an outreach ministry, and so on. Be on the lookout for organizations that are using phony names to appear as legitimate charities. A specious charity may ask you for cash donations and/or your Social Security Number and banking information before offering a receipt.1,2   Inflated refund claims. In this scenario, the scammers do prepare and file 1040s, but they charge big fees up front or claim an exorbitant portion of your refund. The I.R.S. specifically warns against signing a blank return as well as preparers who charge based on the amount of your tax...

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